Crime and Criminology

Criminal Justice

Quiz 3 :
Measuring Crime

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Quiz 3 :
Measuring Crime

Responses could include: -The amount of crime that is undetected, not reported and not recorded. -In order to measure crime and understand its impact on individuals, it needs to be reported and recorded. -Without such information, it is difficult to obtain information for policy and procedure development. -Data is also important for determining and allocating resources. -The information gained from surveys about the dark figure of crime allows some identification of the crimes that go unreported and why. -Crimes like domestic violence and sexual assault are significantly underreported suggesting that informal and formal responses to these crimes may be inadequate.

Responses could include: -Variations in law enforcement activity across police commands. -Variations in state laws as to what constitutes a crime. -Counting rules, that is, what does and does not get counted into a category of crime. -Variations between states and territories in laws, policing and recording practices. -Variations in a victim's understanding of what is and what is not a crime. -Victim's determination that the matter is not serious enough or too common to report or they knew the offender.

Responses could include: -Face-to-face interview advantages: greater flexibility in terms of how questions are asked and potentially higher response rates. -Face-to-face interview disadvantages: 'interviewer effects' (i.e.where the presence of an interviewer can affect the way respondents answer questions) and low response or non-response to sensitive questions. -Mail-out survey advantages: reduced interviewer effects and more time for respondents to consider questions before answering. -Mail-out survey disadvantages: less flexibility and potentially lower response rates.