Worlds Together Study Set 1

History

Quiz 9 :

Alternative Visions of the Nineteenth Century

Quiz 9 :

Alternative Visions of the Nineteenth Century

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Which of the following nineteenth-century principles derived from the revolutions of the late eighteenth century?
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B

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Questions refer to the passage below. Section II-Regarding Merchants. It is plain that the infidel and treacherous British government have monopolized the trade of all the fine and valuable merchandise, such as indigo, cloth, and other articles of shipping, leaving only the trade of trifles to the people. . . . When the Badshahi Government is established, all these aforesaid fraudulent practices shall be dispensed with, and the trade of every article, without exception, both by land and by water, shall be open to the merchants of India. The Azamgarh Proclamation (1857), Bahadur Shah, last Mughal emperor -The arguments put forth in the document best exemplify which of the following ideologies?
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C

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Questions refer to the passage below. Section II-Regarding Merchants. It is plain that the infidel and treacherous British government have monopolized the trade of all the fine and valuable merchandise, such as indigo, cloth, and other articles of shipping, leaving only the trade of trifles to the people. . . . When the Badshahi Government is established, all these aforesaid fraudulent practices shall be dispensed with, and the trade of every article, without exception, both by land and by water, shall be open to the merchants of India. The Azamgarh Proclamation (1857), Bahadur Shah, last Mughal emperor -The proclamation is issued in which of the following historical contexts?
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D

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Questions refer to the passage below. Section II-Regarding Merchants. It is plain that the infidel and treacherous British government have monopolized the trade of all the fine and valuable merchandise, such as indigo, cloth, and other articles of shipping, leaving only the trade of trifles to the people. . . . When the Badshahi Government is established, all these aforesaid fraudulent practices shall be dispensed with, and the trade of every article, without exception, both by land and by water, shall be open to the merchants of India. The Azamgarh Proclamation (1857), Bahadur Shah, last Mughal emperor -According to the document, Indian trade at this time was restricted to:
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Questions refer to the passage below. [O]ne of the ways of their government is the building of their sovereignty upon three things: the people's persons, their honor, and their possessions; and whomsoever they wish to kill or exile or violate his honor or devour his wealth they do so in pursuit of their lusts, without any right in the Shari'a. One of the ways of their government is their imposing on the people monies not laid down by the Shari'a. One of the ways of their government is their intentionally eating whatever food they wish, whether it is religiously permitted or forbidden, and wearing whatever clothes they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and drinking what beverages they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and riding whatever riding beasts they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and taking what women they wish without marriage contract, and living in decorated palaces, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and spreading soft carpets as they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden. Usman dan Fodio, critique of the Hausa state, 1806 -What is the historical situation in which the author was writing?
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Questions refer to the passage below. Yet we must know that the ten thousand names derive from the one name, and the one name from one ancestor. Thus our origins are not different. Since our Heavenly Father gave us birth and nourishment, we are of one form though of separate bodies, and we breathe the same air though in different places. This is why we say, "All are brothers within the four seas." Now, basking in the profound mercy of Heaven, we are of one family. . . . We brothers, our minds having been awakened by our Heavenly Father, joined the camp in the earlier days to support our Sovereign, many bringing parents, wives, uncles, brothers, and whole families. It is a matter of course that we should attend to our parents and look after our wives and children, but when one first creates a new rule, the state must come first and the family last, public interests first and private interests last. "The Principles of the Heavenly Nature," promulgated by the leadership of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom, 1854 -Which of the following statements in "The Principles" represents a change in Chinese cultural thought?
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Questions refer to the passage below. The basis of irreligious criticism is this: man makes religion; religion does not make man. Religion is indeed man's self-consciousness and self-awareness so long as he has not found himself or has lost himself again. But man is not an abstract being, squatting outside the world. Man is the human world, the state, society. This state, this society, produce religion which is an inverted world consciousness, because they are an inverted world. Religion is the general theory of this world, its encyclopedic compendium, its logic in popular form. . . . The struggle against religion is, therefore, indirectly, a struggle against that world whose spiritual aroma is religion. Religious suffering is at the same time an expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the sentiment of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people. The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of men, is a demand for their real happiness. Karl Marx, critique of religion, 1843 -What group is likely the intended audience of this critique?
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Questions refer to the passage below. Yet we must know that the ten thousand names derive from the one name, and the one name from one ancestor. Thus our origins are not different. Since our Heavenly Father gave us birth and nourishment, we are of one form though of separate bodies, and we breathe the same air though in different places. This is why we say, "All are brothers within the four seas." Now, basking in the profound mercy of Heaven, we are of one family. . . . We brothers, our minds having been awakened by our Heavenly Father, joined the camp in the earlier days to support our Sovereign, many bringing parents, wives, uncles, brothers, and whole families. It is a matter of course that we should attend to our parents and look after our wives and children, but when one first creates a new rule, the state must come first and the family last, public interests first and private interests last. "The Principles of the Heavenly Nature," promulgated by the leadership of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom, 1854 -The inspiration of which of the following movements is MOST similar to that of the Taiping Rebellion?
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Questions refer to the passage below. [O]ne of the ways of their government is the building of their sovereignty upon three things: the people's persons, their honor, and their possessions; and whomsoever they wish to kill or exile or violate his honor or devour his wealth they do so in pursuit of their lusts, without any right in the Shari'a. One of the ways of their government is their imposing on the people monies not laid down by the Shari'a. One of the ways of their government is their intentionally eating whatever food they wish, whether it is religiously permitted or forbidden, and wearing whatever clothes they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and drinking what beverages they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and riding whatever riding beasts they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and taking what women they wish without marriage contract, and living in decorated palaces, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and spreading soft carpets as they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden. Usman dan Fodio, critique of the Hausa state, 1806 -Which of the following was a long-term result of movements similar to the one founded by Usman dan Fodio?
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The leaders of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Islamic revitalization movements sought to reestablish the glory of Islam through which practice?
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Viewed collectively, the actions of rebels and dissidents in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries reflected which of the following?
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Questions refer to the passage below. The basis of irreligious criticism is this: man makes religion; religion does not make man. Religion is indeed man's self-consciousness and self-awareness so long as he has not found himself or has lost himself again. But man is not an abstract being, squatting outside the world. Man is the human world, the state, society. This state, this society, produce religion which is an inverted world consciousness, because they are an inverted world. Religion is the general theory of this world, its encyclopedic compendium, its logic in popular form. . . . The struggle against religion is, therefore, indirectly, a struggle against that world whose spiritual aroma is religion. Religious suffering is at the same time an expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the sentiment of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people. The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of men, is a demand for their real happiness. Karl Marx, critique of religion, 1843 -What does the author believe about the struggle against religion?
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Questions refer to the passage below. Section II-Regarding Merchants. It is plain that the infidel and treacherous British government have monopolized the trade of all the fine and valuable merchandise, such as indigo, cloth, and other articles of shipping, leaving only the trade of trifles to the people. . . . When the Badshahi Government is established, all these aforesaid fraudulent practices shall be dispensed with, and the trade of every article, without exception, both by land and by water, shall be open to the merchants of India. The Azamgarh Proclamation (1857), Bahadur Shah, last Mughal emperor -Which of the following was advocated by the passage above?
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Questions refer to the passage below. [O]ne of the ways of their government is the building of their sovereignty upon three things: the people's persons, their honor, and their possessions; and whomsoever they wish to kill or exile or violate his honor or devour his wealth they do so in pursuit of their lusts, without any right in the Shari'a. One of the ways of their government is their imposing on the people monies not laid down by the Shari'a. One of the ways of their government is their intentionally eating whatever food they wish, whether it is religiously permitted or forbidden, and wearing whatever clothes they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and drinking what beverages they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and riding whatever riding beasts they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and taking what women they wish without marriage contract, and living in decorated palaces, whether religiously permitted or forbidden, and spreading soft carpets as they wish, whether religiously permitted or forbidden. Usman dan Fodio, critique of the Hausa state, 1806 -What point is the author trying to make about the rulers of the Hausa?
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Questions refer to the passage below. The basis of irreligious criticism is this: man makes religion; religion does not make man. Religion is indeed man's self-consciousness and self-awareness so long as he has not found himself or has lost himself again. But man is not an abstract being, squatting outside the world. Man is the human world, the state, society. This state, this society, produce religion which is an inverted world consciousness, because they are an inverted world. Religion is the general theory of this world, its encyclopedic compendium, its logic in popular form. . . . The struggle against religion is, therefore, indirectly, a struggle against that world whose spiritual aroma is religion. Religious suffering is at the same time an expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the sentiment of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people. The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of men, is a demand for their real happiness. Karl Marx, critique of religion, 1843 -In what way does Marx compare religion to opium?
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Questions refer to the passage below. The basis of irreligious criticism is this: man makes religion; religion does not make man. Religion is indeed man's self-consciousness and self-awareness so long as he has not found himself or has lost himself again. But man is not an abstract being, squatting outside the world. Man is the human world, the state, society. This state, this society, produce religion which is an inverted world consciousness, because they are an inverted world. Religion is the general theory of this world, its encyclopedic compendium, its logic in popular form. . . . The struggle against religion is, therefore, indirectly, a struggle against that world whose spiritual aroma is religion. Religious suffering is at the same time an expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the sentiment of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people. The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of men, is a demand for their real happiness. Karl Marx, critique of religion, 1843 -What aspect of Enlightenment thinking is reflected in this passage?
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Which of the following groups was most attracted to Wahhabi Islam?
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Questions refer to the passage below. Section II-Regarding Merchants. It is plain that the infidel and treacherous British government have monopolized the trade of all the fine and valuable merchandise, such as indigo, cloth, and other articles of shipping, leaving only the trade of trifles to the people. . . . When the Badshahi Government is established, all these aforesaid fraudulent practices shall be dispensed with, and the trade of every article, without exception, both by land and by water, shall be open to the merchants of India. The Azamgarh Proclamation (1857), Bahadur Shah, last Mughal emperor -According to the document, which of the following was a long-term cause of the revolt against the British?
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Wahhabi Islam was a direct threat to the political power of which of the following?
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Questions refer to the passage below. Yet we must know that the ten thousand names derive from the one name, and the one name from one ancestor. Thus our origins are not different. Since our Heavenly Father gave us birth and nourishment, we are of one form though of separate bodies, and we breathe the same air though in different places. This is why we say, "All are brothers within the four seas." Now, basking in the profound mercy of Heaven, we are of one family. . . . We brothers, our minds having been awakened by our Heavenly Father, joined the camp in the earlier days to support our Sovereign, many bringing parents, wives, uncles, brothers, and whole families. It is a matter of course that we should attend to our parents and look after our wives and children, but when one first creates a new rule, the state must come first and the family last, public interests first and private interests last. "The Principles of the Heavenly Nature," promulgated by the leadership of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom, 1854 -Which of the follow statements in "The Principles" represents continuity in Chinese cultural thought?
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