Sociology in Our Times Study Set 4

Sociology

Quiz 3 :
Socialization

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Quiz 3 :
Socialization

"Looking Glass self" is a concept created by a sociologist, Charles Horton Cooley, which proposes that the self concept of an individual is formed by various interactions with people and social entities around. An individual's self concept is highly influenced by how others perceive the individual. The student of Sociology is considered as being educated, intelligent, knowledgeable and capable individual. However, people treat the student as lacking in leadership abilities. Many times the student is denied responsible roles and often assigned tasks that are intellectually oriented. The student feels that others have a faulty understanding about his self and are not aware of the real capabilities.

The social philosopher George Herbert Mead, proposes that there two aspects to the self concept of an individual. One is the "I" component and the other is "Me" Component. Both components coexist within an individual. The "I" is the self expression formed by the natural traits of the individual, which acts spontaneously and creatively. The 'Me' aspect is learned by the individual through interactions with others. 'Me' represents the attitudes and normative behaviors expressed by the individual in the given situation. The student of Sociology has "I" as the most dominant component. Often the student displays insightful, creative and spontaneous behavior while disregards the opinions of others, which indicate a weak 'Me' component.

Toys are valuable paraphernalia for raising happy children. Depending on the nature of toys and its suitability for the age group, toys can help the children in development of the language skills, psycho-motor skills, cognitive abilities and social skills too. The researcher may select four types of toys, such as symbolic toys (picture of common things such as telephone, car, etc.), responsive toys (toys that create a sound or shows a visual impact as a response to the child's action), organizational toys (toys that can be arranged in some pattern to create a form or structure), and Social toys (toys that can be used to engage in make-believe play). A group of children may be exposed to these types of toys with different intensities of stimulation, and a post test to see the effect of each type of toys on socialization may be conducted. Intervening variables such as number of people in the house, child's exposure to neighborhood, enrollment in play school, etc. may be recorded to isolate the effect of toys on the child.