Quiz 13: Industrial Pollution and Environmental Regulation

Business

The legal battle between the environmentalists and the loggers or private companies that engage in harvesting and selling timber business has no end. The environmentalists were concerned about the destruction of northern spotted owls' habitat due to human's self-centered act of profiteering from the destruction of the old-growth forests. The home of these birds stretches the entire NWP regions, which drove environmentalists to use the owl as a pretense to oppose any form of logging in forests. The loggers, who depend on their livelihood by trading timbers are rendered jobless and their counties are plagued with various social issues, therefore they opposed the strict legislation that prohibited any form of timber harvesting. The lumberjacks took a reactionary approach by engaging in a violent form of protest such a killing the bird to show non-conformity with the established law. It became an intense scientific, rational, legal, and emotional clash between those who attempted to preserve the old habitat of the northern spotted owls and the loggers who depended their subsistence on the fecundity of the public forests. It should be noted that with the enactment of the ESA 1972, which required the protection of animals that are designated as endangered species, the northern spotted owl was identified as an endangered species, so a person caught harming the owl can be penalized with $50, 00 and imprisonment for a year. This drove the counties who depended their lives on selling timber toward unemployment and forced to rely on safety net programs funded by the federal government. The statute that declares the entire forests of the NWP to preserve the northern spotted owl at the expense of costing millions of jobs, closing educational institutions, defunding libraries, closing mills, depletion of tax revenues, and various other personal adversities is unconstitutional and should not be supported to some extent since various studies have revealed that the bird is yet to be extinct although their population has been declining. The environmentalists' act of pressurizing and filing lawsuits to halt the logging of timbers in the entire forests of NWP for preserving the habitat of the northern spotted owl is too far-fetched and one-sided. They are absolutists who are less concerned about the negative consequences their actions have inflicted on others. The strict legislation has not benefitted the bird since migratory barred owls overtook the persevered old-growth forests of the northern spotted owls nor it served the loggers who depend their livelihood on selling timber. Therefore, a balanced approach is needed to protect the people affected by the ESA and to preserve the habitat of the owls.

The legal battle between the environmentalists and the loggers or private companies that engage in harvesting and selling timber business has no conclusion. The environmentalists were concerned about the destruction of northern spotted owls' habitat due to human's self-centered act of profiteering from the destruction of the old-growth forests. The home of these birds stretches the entire NWP regions, which drove environmentalists to use the owl as a pretense to oppose any form of logging in forests. The loggers, who depend on their livelihood by trading timbers are rendered jobless and their counties are plagued with various social issues, therefore they opposed the strict legislation that prohibited any form of timber harvesting. To bring a balanced approach, the Clinton administration has enacted some rules to save the owls as well as the affected people. President Clinton administration's new forest policy called the NWFP that aimed to appease both the environmentalists and the loggers by allowing logging in some areas, which was a 90 percent decrease from the earlier timber harvesting areas, and also keeping the NWFP to function from fifty to hundred years for the owls to increase their population. The agency FWS adopted this plan, however, the environmental activists rejected it and pushed to incorporate private lands under the act ESA. With this enactment, any form of lumberjacking can be carried out after submitting a three-year cessation on logging when an empty owl's nest is spotted to assure that the nest has been discarded and a biological opinion is obliged for carrying out afforestation or highway maintenance in the owl's territory. The endless battles between the environmentalists and the loggers continued where the environmentalists favored a complete halt of timber harvesting while the loggers want more relaxation on timber harvesting restrictions. The agencies FWS and BLM should be allowed to manage the area for more timber produce from twenty-five percent to a maximum forty percent as this would increase the timber production and would generate revenue at a staggering high of more than hundred million and employment opportunities for those who have been affected by the enforced ESA. The proposed plan of BLM to manage more areas, if declined, would further lead to the loss of thousands of timber-related jobs and can drive many toward poverty since the Bush administration has already discontinued the safety net programs for the affected loggers who depended on timber harvesting for their livelihood. The BLM and the FWS should ensure that the primary habitat of the owls is not encroached and keep out of the purview of the loggers. A balanced approach is necessitated to preserve the species and save the economy of the country since it is the concern of thousands of people whose livelihood is dependent on forest produce and for the preservation of this bird from becoming extinct.

The loggers, who depend on their livelihood by trading timbers are rendered jobless and their counties are plagued with various social issues, therefore they opposed the strict legislation that prohibited any form of timber harvesting. The government act of incorporating private lands can be considered as violating the fundamental rights which are enshrined under the Fifth A. The federal government act of prohibiting loggers to harvest timber in areas near the habitat of the northern spotted owl can be seen as infringing the rights of the landowners since the Constitution provides the right to liberty, equality, and property. Nevertheless, one should know that the fundamental rights are not absolute and are restrained when certain programs are carried out for the betterment of society or in this case to protect the northern spotted owls from extinction. The government should provide compensation to the people affected by the ESA for the damages and losses they have incurred. The Bush administration's action of discontinuing safety net programs for the affected loggers have worsened the condition of these people and pushed many toward poverty. It is critical to bear the responsibility of preserving or protecting the environment and the endangered species by the citizens or taxpayers. The government and the environmentalists alone cannot protect or conserve the environment, therefore citizens should be accountable for carrying out these responsibilities.