Contemporary Marketing Study Set 6

Business

Quiz 16 :

Advertising and Public Relations

Quiz 16 :

Advertising and Public Relations

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What are the three primary objectives of advertising? Give an example of when each one might be used.
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Three advertising objectives:
Advertising is linked closely to the integrated marketing communications (IMC). It consists of paid communication through number of media that persuades the audience.
Three primary objectives of advertising:
1. Informative advertising:
Informative advertising develops the initial demand of a service, good, idea, organization, place, person, or cause. It suits for the introductory product life cycle stage.
Example:
Introducing a new product X in the market with money back guarantee
2. Persuasive advertising:
Persuasive demand increases the demand for the service, good, idea, organization, place, person, or cause. This is a competitive promotion suits the growth stage and the initial maturity stages.
Example: X detergent keeps the clothes clean at a least cost; saving money for further purchases of clothes.
3. Reminder advertising:
Reminder advertising implies promotional activities by holding prominently the service, good, idea, organization, place, person, or public cause. It is used commonly in the latter maturity stage until the completion of the decline stages of product life cycle (PLC).
Example: X bank creates documentaries during commercial breaks about the early history of the nation and the organization.

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What are some of the benefits and drawbacks of using celebrity testimonials in advertising? Identify an ad you believe makes effective use of a celebrity's endorsement, and explain why.
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Celebrity advertising:
Celebrity advertising is the most effective marketing technique; wherein the marketers use celebrity as a means to attract the target audience with instant recognition and to reach different ethnic groups etc.
Benefits of celebrity advertising:
• Enhancing brand equity and recognition : Consumers are instantly connected when any celebrity endorses an advertisement. Celebrity advertising helps in improving the value of an asset and it strengthens the brand recognition.
• Fluctuation in the consumer attitude : Celebrity endorsements are useful when the consumers have started losing interest in the product. There is a stage of maturity in the product's life cycle.
• Builds short term brand credibility : It helps in building short term believability among the consumers. When a celebrity is featured in an advertisement, the consumer is likely to follow their idols.
• Enhances the purchasing intention in the consumers : Celebrity endorsements leave a strong impact on consumers. The most famous example is fairness creams ads wherein the celebrity shares her experience of using the fairness cream. It persuades the consumers to buy the product.
• New dimension and competitive advantage for the brand : Every company tries to sell their products differently and come up with new ideas that set them apart from other competitors. For example, the automobile sector is always dynamic and keeps bringing innovation and creativity in their car models. The best way to attract consumers is to rope big personalities from sports, glamour industry and use them to endorse their products. It gives a new meaning to their brand image.
• Cultural road block is removed in promoting worldwide reputation : It means that the celebrity endorsements play a vital role in catering to different ethnic groups across the world. It connects the consumer and the product and influences them to make a purchase.
Drawbacks of celebrity advertising:
• Skepticism of consumers in consuming the endorsed product. There is a possibility that some consumers don't buy products that celebrity endorses. For example, a shampoo sold by an endorser can persuade the consumers to buy the product while for some it does not make an effective impact. The harmful impact of branded shampoos can be one of the reasons.
• Lesser credibility for those endorsing more products : Many a times, consumers end up losing faith on celebrity who endorses more than one product. This is so because at times consumers doubt on celebrity's credibility. Switching from one brand one another can harm the brand's image heavily.
• Boredom of single product and single endorser : There comes a point when a consumer is over by watching a single endorser for the same product repeatedly. It creates monotony in consumer's mind. Hence, a change should always be there so as to hook the consumers to a particular brand.
• Multiple celebrity endorsement chaos : A celebrity doing multiple endorsements is likely to create clutter in consumer's mind. Consequently, the consumer ends up remembering a celebrity rather than an advertisement.
• Contradictory brand image endorsed : It means making the celebrity the face of the brand does not mean that it will connect to the consumers. Many a times, celebrity endorsements fail to convince the consumers about the product's advantages.
• Vampire effect drags the attention of the public from product to celebrity : The marketers often lose the essence of the product by focusing more on celebrity and the ad background rather than on the core product.
Example of effective celebrity endorsement:
Product: Beauty products
Beauty products can be effectively targeted through the celebrity as the consumers are likely to follow them strongly on their beauty and skin secrets. It will easily reach the consumer as the celebrity is well known and the product becomes reliable.

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Choose a print ad to cut out and place on a poster board. With a marker, identify all the elements of the ad. Then identify what you believe is the objective of the ad-to inform, persuade, or remind. Finally, identify the strategy used-comparative, celebrity, or retail. If there is an interactive component offered, note that, too.
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Print advertisement:
Print advertisement is the media of advertising a product through printed copies.
Application and analysis:
Product: Mango juice
Advertising technique: Print advertisement
Concept the advertisement:
• The juice bottle is placed in the roots of a mango plant.
• Nearby there are green grasses planted around the plant.
• The total advertisement has a blue sky background.
• "True fruit" a tag line appears in the soil near the bottle.
• Organization's trademark is also found.
Objective of the advertisement:
• Inform about the new mango juice
• Persuade the attracted consumers
• Remind the product specialty
Strategy used in the advertisement:
The strategy used is retail as the other two comparative or celebrity is not used in the advertisement.
Interactive component in the advertisement is that the complete picture diverts the customer to purchase considered as action towards the product.

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Identify and define the two broad categories of advertising. Give an example of each.
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Choose one of the following products and outline a possible media schedule for advertising. a. toy b. line of bathing suits c. line of candles
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In an effort to target the youngest of consumers, some firms have begun to advertise tiny mobile phones sized to fit the hands of children. The MO1, developed by toy firm Imaginarium and the Spanish communications firm Telefonica, is designed specifically for the younger set-it's a real cell phone, not a toy. In Europe, where the phone is marketed, some parents and consumer groups are objecting to the marketing of the product, noting that long-term health effects of cell phone use are unknown, and young children are quickly impressed by advertising. "The mobile telephone industry is acting like the tobacco industry by designing products that addict the very young," argues one environmental advocacy group for children. 57 Do you believe that Imaginarium and Telefonica are acting in an ethical manner? Why or why not? Be sure to use concepts from this chapter to build your argument.
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Not-for-profit advertising. Review the material in the chapter on creating an advertisement and then go to the Web site listed here. It outlines the basic steps involved in creating an advertisement for a not-for-profit organization. Review the material and prepare a brief report comparing and contrasting the process of creating an advertisement for a for-profit and a not-for-profit organization. http://marketing.about.com/cs/nonprofitmrktg/a/8stepnonprofit.htm
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Select two different advertisers' television or print ads for the same product category (cars or soft drinks, for instance) and decide what emotion each appeals to. Which ad is more effective and why?
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How are interactive ads different from traditional ads? How are they similar?
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According to Advertising Age, some of the top advertising campaigns of all time include Nike's "Just do it" (1988), McDonald's "You deserve a break today" (1971), and Burger King's "Have it your way" (1973).56 With a classmate, choose an ad campaign you think is effective-based on its slogan, images, storyline, or whatever strikes you. Present the ad and your evaluation of it to the class.
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Describe each of the four major advertising strategies.
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Super Bowl advertising. Visit the Web sites listed here. How many different organizations ran ads during the most recent Super Bowl? Which organizations have run the most ads in Super Bowls? During the most recent Super Bowl, which ads were the highest rated? The lowest rated? How much has the cost of a 30-second Super Bowl ad changed since the first game was played? http://www.superbowl-commercials.org http://www.cbssports.com/video/player/superbowlcommercials
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With a classmate, create your own plan for cross- promoting two products you think would be good candidates for cross-promotion.
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Access the Internet and surf around to some sites that interest you. How many banner ads or pop-ups do you see? Do you like to view these ads, or do you find them intrusive? Which are most appealing?
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Politicians and " Their " Music As political advertising becomes increasingly big business, the branding that accompanies a campaign has come to rely heavily on music. This is not surprising, according to neuroscientists, whose research on the brain reveals that music has the power to infuse itself into our nervous system, triggering feelings and responses and, hence, our behavior. While the earliest political marketers may not have known the scientific benefits of music, they recognized that music has power. Presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt used the song "Happy Days Are Here Again" during his 1932 campaign, when America was caught in the grip of the Great Depression and the nation's mood was desperate. The song's message enabled voters to envision a better day on the horizon and transfer that emotional response to their feelings about the candidate. After Roosevelt won the election, he reinforced the song's message in his inaugural address with the famous words, "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself." Years after his presidency, strains of Fleetwood Mac's "Don't Stop" still conjure up memories of Bill Clinton's 1992 campaign. Pairing a candidate with a wildly popular song-sparked fervor among followers. However, when it came to a campaign song choice for Hillary Clinton's run for president, she picked a less wellknown song by Celine Dion called, "You and I." The song lyrics were criticized for being about "dreams" instead of her opponent's song lyrics about having "plans." The use of music in political campaigns can have its pitfalls. Consider the glitch during Ronald Reagan's 1984 presidential run, when the Bruce Springsteen hit "Born in the USA" was selected as a campaign theme. Had Reagan or his handlers listened to the lyrics first, they would have recognized them not as the words of a patriotic song but the bitter memoir of a Vietnam veteran. Of course, part of the issue stems from the unauthorized use of artists' copyrighted work. But that, apparently, is not all: musicians work hard to build their brand, and many are offended by the idea of a candidate they don't support glomming on to that brand. For example, the rock duo Heart was reportedly irritated when vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin used their 1970s hit "Barracuda" as her theme song, playing offa nickname from her high-school basketball days. As it turned out, however, the Republican National Committee had purchased the rights to the song. Rand Paul, a candidate for the U.S. Senate from Kentucky, recently heard from the attorney for Canadian rockers Rush after Paul co-opted their music for his Web ads, a fund-raising video, and public appearances. Talking Heads co-founder David Byrne sued then Florida governor Charlie Crist for using "Road to Nowhere" in his campaign advertising for a Senate seat. In a letter posted on his Web site, Byrne claimed that while he licenses his work for dance companies and student filmmakers, he has never permitted its use in advertising. Rock guitarist Steve Miller got riled up when Crist's opponent, Mark Rubio, used the Steve Miller Band tune "Take the Money and Run" to underscore Crist's move from Republican to independent after accepting GOP money. How does the use of music in a political campaign play a role in establishing a candidate's brand?
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Identify the different types of emotional appeals in advertising. What are the benefits and pitfalls of each?
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Politicians and " Their " Music As political advertising becomes increasingly big business, the branding that accompanies a campaign has come to rely heavily on music. This is not surprising, according to neuroscientists, whose research on the brain reveals that music has the power to infuse itself into our nervous system, triggering feelings and responses and, hence, our behavior. While the earliest political marketers may not have known the scientific benefits of music, they recognized that music has power. Presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt used the song "Happy Days Are Here Again" during his 1932 campaign, when America was caught in the grip of the Great Depression and the nation's mood was desperate. The song's message enabled voters to envision a better day on the horizon and transfer that emotional response to their feelings about the candidate. After Roosevelt won the election, he reinforced the song's message in his inaugural address with the famous words, "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself." Years after his presidency, strains of Fleetwood Mac's "Don't Stop" still conjure up memories of Bill Clinton's 1992 campaign. Pairing a candidate with a wildly popular song-sparked fervor among followers. However, when it came to a campaign song choice for Hillary Clinton's run for president, she picked a less wellknown song by Celine Dion called, "You and I." The song lyrics were criticized for being about "dreams" instead of her opponent's song lyrics about having "plans." The use of music in political campaigns can have its pitfalls. Consider the glitch during Ronald Reagan's 1984 presidential run, when the Bruce Springsteen hit "Born in the USA" was selected as a campaign theme. Had Reagan or his handlers listened to the lyrics first, they would have recognized them not as the words of a patriotic song but the bitter memoir of a Vietnam veteran. Of course, part of the issue stems from the unauthorized use of artists' copyrighted work. But that, apparently, is not all: musicians work hard to build their brand, and many are offended by the idea of a candidate they don't support glomming on to that brand. For example, the rock duo Heart was reportedly irritated when vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin used their 1970s hit "Barracuda" as her theme song, playing offa nickname from her high-school basketball days. As it turned out, however, the Republican National Committee had purchased the rights to the song. Rand Paul, a candidate for the U.S. Senate from Kentucky, recently heard from the attorney for Canadian rockers Rush after Paul co-opted their music for his Web ads, a fund-raising video, and public appearances. Talking Heads co-founder David Byrne sued then Florida governor Charlie Crist for using "Road to Nowhere" in his campaign advertising for a Senate seat. In a letter posted on his Web site, Byrne claimed that while he licenses his work for dance companies and student filmmakers, he has never permitted its use in advertising. Rock guitarist Steve Miller got riled up when Crist's opponent, Mark Rubio, used the Steve Miller Band tune "Take the Money and Run" to underscore Crist's move from Republican to independent after accepting GOP money. Does a candidate's use of a song you like (or dislike) affect your overall impression of the candidate? Why?
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In an effort to target the youngest of consumers, some firms have begun to advertise tiny mobile phones sized to fit the hands of children. The MO1, developed by toy firm Imaginarium and the Spanish communications firm Telefonica, is designed specifically for the younger set-it's a real cell phone, not a toy. In Europe, where the phone is marketed, some parents and consumer groups are objecting to the marketing of the product, noting that long-term health effects of cell phone use are unknown, and young children are quickly impressed by advertising. "The mobile telephone industry is acting like the tobacco industry by designing products that addict the very young," argues one environmental advocacy group for children. 57 What steps might Imaginarium and Telefonica take to develop good public relations and generate positive publicity surrounding their product?
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Future of newspaper advertising. Using a news source, such as Google news (http://news.google.com) or Yahoo! news (http://news.yahoo.com), research the current status of newspaper advertising. How much has ad revenue declined in recent years? Do you agree or disagree that the future of newspaper advertising lies online?
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Do outdoor ads and pop-up ads have any characteristics in common? What are they?
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