Marketing Study Set 1

Business

Quiz 13 :

Services Marketing

Quiz 13 :

Services Marketing

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Delivering consistently high-quality service is difficult for service marketers. Describe an instance when you received high-quality service and an instance when you experienced low-quality service. What contributed to your perception of high quality? Of low quality?
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In the United States, many shops provide confectionary services. Once the order for 1,000 pastries was booked, the order was delivered with full efficiency and there was no discrepancy.
But once, a similar order was placed during Christmas season. This time the order did not meet the delivery expectations. The delivery was not timely and the price was high.
This gave the impression that during the festive season the quality of service deteriorates, and proper care should be taken when such services are offered in peak season.

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Products that are services rather than tangible goods present unique challenges to companies when they formulate marketing strategy. A clear comprehension of the concepts that apply specifically to service products is essential when developing the marketing plan. These concepts will form the basis for decisions in several plan areas. To assist you in relating the information in this chapter to the development of your marketing plan for a service product, focus on the following: Using Figure 13.1, determine your product's degree of tangibility. If your product lies close to the tangible end of the continuum, then you may proceed to the questions in the next chapter. If your product is more intangible, then continue with this chapter's issues. img The information obtained from these questions should assist you in developing various aspects of your marketing plan found in the "Interactive Marketing Plan" exercise at www.cengagebrain.com.
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The health care comes under a high intangible degree of service.
The services of health care are intangible in nature, as the services are not of physical nature and cannot be perceived with the senses.

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Matchmaker.com The Internet abounds with dating sites, but few offer as much information about their members as Matchmaker.com. Matchmaker profiles are gleaned from a survey of about 60 question and essay responses. Check out the site at www.matchmaker.com. Discuss the degree to which experience and credence qualities exist in the services offered by Matchmaker.com and other dating websites.
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In this website the experts choose the partners after detailed study of the profile of the candidate. The experts then find the matches accordingly and let the candidate have a watch over the profile of the selected candidates.
In comparison to the other websites the information here is more authentic and verified by the experts of the website which usually is not present in the other websites.

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Matchmaker.com The Internet abounds with dating sites, but few offer as much information about their members as Matchmaker.com. Matchmaker profiles are gleaned from a survey of about 60 question and essay responses. Check out the site at www.matchmaker.com. How does Matchmaker.com enhance customer service and foster better client-based relationships through its Internet marketing efforts?
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UNICEF and the Good Shirts Project The United Nation's Children's Fund (UNICEF) was created in 1946 as a nonprofi t to protect the welfare and rights of children around the world. Wherever children are threatened by natural disasters, extreme poverty, violence, disease, and other problems, UNICEF works with local and international partners to raise money and deliver services to relieve suffering and meet basic needs. Now UNICEF has teamed up with New York-based artists Justin and Christine Gignac, plus the online T-shirt retailer Threadless, on the Good Shirts Project. This is a combination fundraiser and educational program, raising awareness of the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa and raising money to provide clean water, food, health supplies, and other desperately needed items for children and adults in Somalia, Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Djibouti. "Hundreds of thousands of children are at imminent risk of death," Gignac explains. "Obviously, we need to do something to help, and are fortunate to have been included in this effort to raise money for the U.S. Fund for UNICEF to support lifesaving relief efforts." Good Shirts follows in the footsteps of the Gignacs' previous "Wants for Sale" art series, where they created paintings of items and experiences they wanted-and sold each painting for the amount of money they would have to pay for the item or experience. Similarly, each of the UNICEF shirts is priced at the cost of buying what the shirt shows for people in the Horn of Africa. For example, the white T-shirt featuring a big, colorful mosquito sells for $18.57, which pays for three insecticide-treated nets to protect from malaria. The white T-shirt featuring a green cargo plane sells for $300,000, the cost of chartering a flight from UNICEF's warehouse in Copenhagen to carry aid supplies to Nairobi, Kenya. In all, the artists created a dozen eye-catching T-shirts with light-hearted images "to remind people of the good they're doing by buying one," says Gignac. Threadless produces the T-shirts and sells them online, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to UNICEF. The artists donate their time and designs, and the BBH New York ad agency provides free marketing assistance. "We're literally letting people wear their donation as a source of pride and as a means to spread the word," says a BBH executive. "If friends get a little competitive over who's being more altruistic, all the better." To communicate with potential donors and keep the public informed about its services, UNICEF is an active user of social media. It has nearly 1 million followers on Twitter, where it uses the #goodshirts hashtag when tweeting about Good Shirts. UNICEF has nearly 2 million followers on Facebook and maintains a YouTube channel where videos are posted in multiple languages. Good Shirts is one of a number of initiatives that UNICEF uses to call attention to world trouble-spots where children are in need of aid. When UNICEF's celebrity ambassadors, including Sarah Jessica Parker, Clay Aiken, and Laurence Fishburne, travel to these areas, they use their fame to spread UNICEF's message and attract media coverage. In a decades-old Halloween tradition, many U.S. children carry orange "Trick or Treat for UNICEF" containers and ask for donations as they go door-to-door in their costumes. No matter where in the world children are threatened, UNICEF is ready to help. What kinds of objectives do you think UNICEF set for the Good Shirts Project? How should UNICEF evaluate the results of this project?
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As discussed in this chapter, the characteristics of services affect the development of marketing mixes for services. Choose a specific service and explain how each marketing mix element could be affected by these service characteristics.
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Marketing In-Store Medical Services: Flu Shots in Aisle 6 Millions of people with minor ailments or urgent medical needs are using in-store clinics located inside drugstore chains, discount stores, and supermarkets. Across the United States, more than 1,000 stores now contain walk-in clinics, and the number is growing. Hundreds of CVS drugstores contain MinuteClinics, and hundreds of Walgreens drugstores contain Take Care clinics. Both Walmart and Target have clinics in selected stores, as do regional grocery chains such as Kroger and United Supermarkets. In most in-store clinics, consumers meet with a nurse practitioner or a physician's assistant who is trained to treat earaches, sprained ankles, sinus infections, and similar complaints (depending on state and local regulations, doctors provide overall medical supervision but may not have to be on-site at every clinic). If needed, staff members can issue prescriptions that customers can fill immediately at the store's pharmacy. They are also ready to administer vaccinations against tetanus, influenza, and other illnesses, and provide physical checkups before youngsters go to camp or join a sports team. The two main keys to successfully marketing in-store medical services are convenience and price. The clinics promote their convenient location inside local stores and emphasize that no appointment is necessary. Most in-store clinics offer day, evening, and weekend hours to accommoget date consumers' busy schedules. Rarely do consumers have to wait more than a few minutes when they stop by to get a flu shot or have a sore throat treated. Having the pharmacy located in the next aisle is particularly convenient for consumers who walk out of the clinic with a prescription to fill. The clinics are also handy alternatives when the family doctor's office is closed, too far away, or unable to see a patient right away. Some consumers, especially those without health insurance, may not even have family doctors. "We know that each demographic group has unique problems," observes the CEO of Take Care Health Systems, which operates clinics inside Walgreens stores. "More-affluent patients can't get in to see their doctors, while less-affluent patients often don't have doctors." Price is another positive. The price for treatment at in-store clinics is generally far lower than at a doctor's office, let alone in the emergency room. Although most of the clinics accept popular health insurance plans as partial or full payment for services, consumers who lack insurance are price-sensitive because they must cover the costs themselves. Price is therefore an important element for marketing in-store medical services. Describing MinuteClinic's appeal, a CVS spokesperson notes: "High-quality care and lower costs combine to offer real relief to consumers struggling with the steadily increasing costs of health care." One characteristic of services delivered in an in-store clinic is a little different from conventional medical services. Clinic staff members don't have the opportunity to develop close relationships with the people they treat, because consumers are only occasional visitors, coming in when they have an unexpected illness or know it's time for a flu shot. In contrast, family physicians can and do get to know their patients very well over the course of many visits. "When a child comes in for something minor, we use that time to talk about other things," says a pediatrician in Rochester. "All of that gets missed at the retail clinic." For their part, the clinics aren't marketing themselves as replacements for regular medical care. Still, MinuteClinic is aware that one-third of its customers do not have a family doctor. Its chief nursing officer is ready to help with that need, too: "That's why we keep a list of local doctors who are taking new patients at each location," she says. "We want people to establish a relationship with a primary care doctor." Recent changes to U.S. legislation affecting the healthcare industry, including provisions for expanding access to health insurance, are affecting the marketing of in-store clinics as well. Walgreens is preparing for higher demand by opening new Take Care clinics in more stores and considering whether to offer a wider range of medical services. Take Care and Walgreens jointly market the in-store clinics in Walgreens' ad campaigns and on the chain's website. In addition, Take Care uses its website plus television, radio, and direct mail to tell consumers about the features and benefits of its services. Attention, shoppers: Easy access to medical treatment is only one aisle away. Do you think consumers would use search qualities, experience qualities, or credence qualities to evaluate the instore medical services? Explain your answer
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Marketing In-Store Medical Services: Flu Shots in Aisle 6 Millions of people with minor ailments or urgent medical needs are using in-store clinics located inside drugstore chains, discount stores, and supermarkets. Across the United States, more than 1,000 stores now contain walk-in clinics, and the number is growing. Hundreds of CVS drugstores contain MinuteClinics, and hundreds of Walgreens drugstores contain Take Care clinics. Both Walmart and Target have clinics in selected stores, as do regional grocery chains such as Kroger and United Supermarkets. In most in-store clinics, consumers meet with a nurse practitioner or a physician's assistant who is trained to treat earaches, sprained ankles, sinus infections, and similar complaints (depending on state and local regulations, doctors provide overall medical supervision but may not have to be on-site at every clinic). If needed, staff members can issue prescriptions that customers can fill immediately at the store's pharmacy. They are also ready to administer vaccinations against tetanus, influenza, and other illnesses, and provide physical checkups before youngsters go to camp or join a sports team. The two main keys to successfully marketing in-store medical services are convenience and price. The clinics promote their convenient location inside local stores and emphasize that no appointment is necessary. Most in-store clinics offer day, evening, and weekend hours to accommoget date consumers' busy schedules. Rarely do consumers have to wait more than a few minutes when they stop by to get a flu shot or have a sore throat treated. Having the pharmacy located in the next aisle is particularly convenient for consumers who walk out of the clinic with a prescription to fill. The clinics are also handy alternatives when the family doctor's office is closed, too far away, or unable to see a patient right away. Some consumers, especially those without health insurance, may not even have family doctors. "We know that each demographic group has unique problems," observes the CEO of Take Care Health Systems, which operates clinics inside Walgreens stores. "More-affluent patients can't get in to see their doctors, while less-affluent patients often don't have doctors." Price is another positive. The price for treatment at in-store clinics is generally far lower than at a doctor's office, let alone in the emergency room. Although most of the clinics accept popular health insurance plans as partial or full payment for services, consumers who lack insurance are price-sensitive because they must cover the costs themselves. Price is therefore an important element for marketing in-store medical services. Describing MinuteClinic's appeal, a CVS spokesperson notes: "High-quality care and lower costs combine to offer real relief to consumers struggling with the steadily increasing costs of health care." One characteristic of services delivered in an in-store clinic is a little different from conventional medical services. Clinic staff members don't have the opportunity to develop close relationships with the people they treat, because consumers are only occasional visitors, coming in when they have an unexpected illness or know it's time for a flu shot. In contrast, family physicians can and do get to know their patients very well over the course of many visits. "When a child comes in for something minor, we use that time to talk about other things," says a pediatrician in Rochester. "All of that gets missed at the retail clinic." For their part, the clinics aren't marketing themselves as replacements for regular medical care. Still, MinuteClinic is aware that one-third of its customers do not have a family doctor. Its chief nursing officer is ready to help with that need, too: "That's why we keep a list of local doctors who are taking new patients at each location," she says. "We want people to establish a relationship with a primary care doctor." Recent changes to U.S. legislation affecting the healthcare industry, including provisions for expanding access to health insurance, are affecting the marketing of in-store clinics as well. Walgreens is preparing for higher demand by opening new Take Care clinics in more stores and considering whether to offer a wider range of medical services. Take Care and Walgreens jointly market the in-store clinics in Walgreens' ad campaigns and on the chain's website. In addition, Take Care uses its website plus television, radio, and direct mail to tell consumers about the features and benefits of its services. Attention, shoppers: Easy access to medical treatment is only one aisle away. How do you suggest that in-store clinics like MinuteClinic and Take Care manage the service expectations of consumers seeking medical attention?
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In advertising services, a company must often use symbols to represent the offered product. Identify three service organizations you have seen in outdoor, television, or magazine advertising. What symbols do these organizations use to represent their services? What message do the symbols convey to potential customers?
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Products that are services rather than tangible goods present unique challenges to companies when they formulate marketing strategy. A clear comprehension of the concepts that apply specifically to service products is essential when developing the marketing plan. These concepts will form the basis for decisions in several plan areas. To assist you in relating the information in this chapter to the development of your marketing plan for a service product, focus on the following: Discuss your product with regard to the six service characteristics. To what degree does it possess the qualities that make up each of these characteristics? The information obtained from these questions should assist you in developing various aspects of your marketing plan found in the "Interactive Marketing Plan" exercise at www.cengagebrain.com.
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Matchmaker.com The Internet abounds with dating sites, but few offer as much information about their members as Matchmaker.com. Matchmaker profiles are gleaned from a survey of about 60 question and essay responses. Check out the site at www.matchmaker.com. Classify Matchmaker.com's product in terms of its position on the service continuum.
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How important are services in the U.S. economy?
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Products that are services rather than tangible goods present unique challenges to companies when they formulate marketing strategy. A clear comprehension of the concepts that apply specifically to service products is essential when developing the marketing plan. These concepts will form the basis for decisions in several plan areas. To assist you in relating the information in this chapter to the development of your marketing plan for a service product, focus on the following: Using Table 13.1 as a guide, discuss the marketing challenges you are likely to experience. img The information obtained from these questions should assist you in developing various aspects of your marketing plan found in the "Interactive Marketing Plan" exercise at www.cengagebrain.com.
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Marketing In-Store Medical Services: Flu Shots in Aisle 6 Millions of people with minor ailments or urgent medical needs are using in-store clinics located inside drugstore chains, discount stores, and supermarkets. Across the United States, more than 1,000 stores now contain walk-in clinics, and the number is growing. Hundreds of CVS drugstores contain MinuteClinics, and hundreds of Walgreens drugstores contain Take Care clinics. Both Walmart and Target have clinics in selected stores, as do regional grocery chains such as Kroger and United Supermarkets. In most in-store clinics, consumers meet with a nurse practitioner or a physician's assistant who is trained to treat earaches, sprained ankles, sinus infections, and similar complaints (depending on state and local regulations, doctors provide overall medical supervision but may not have to be on-site at every clinic). If needed, staff members can issue prescriptions that customers can fill immediately at the store's pharmacy. They are also ready to administer vaccinations against tetanus, influenza, and other illnesses, and provide physical checkups before youngsters go to camp or join a sports team. The two main keys to successfully marketing in-store medical services are convenience and price. The clinics promote their convenient location inside local stores and emphasize that no appointment is necessary. Most in-store clinics offer day, evening, and weekend hours to accommoget date consumers' busy schedules. Rarely do consumers have to wait more than a few minutes when they stop by to get a flu shot or have a sore throat treated. Having the pharmacy located in the next aisle is particularly convenient for consumers who walk out of the clinic with a prescription to fill. The clinics are also handy alternatives when the family doctor's office is closed, too far away, or unable to see a patient right away. Some consumers, especially those without health insurance, may not even have family doctors. "We know that each demographic group has unique problems," observes the CEO of Take Care Health Systems, which operates clinics inside Walgreens stores. "More-affluent patients can't get in to see their doctors, while less-affluent patients often don't have doctors." Price is another positive. The price for treatment at in-store clinics is generally far lower than at a doctor's office, let alone in the emergency room. Although most of the clinics accept popular health insurance plans as partial or full payment for services, consumers who lack insurance are price-sensitive because they must cover the costs themselves. Price is therefore an important element for marketing in-store medical services. Describing MinuteClinic's appeal, a CVS spokesperson notes: "High-quality care and lower costs combine to offer real relief to consumers struggling with the steadily increasing costs of health care." One characteristic of services delivered in an in-store clinic is a little different from conventional medical services. Clinic staff members don't have the opportunity to develop close relationships with the people they treat, because consumers are only occasional visitors, coming in when they have an unexpected illness or know it's time for a flu shot. In contrast, family physicians can and do get to know their patients very well over the course of many visits. "When a child comes in for something minor, we use that time to talk about other things," says a pediatrician in Rochester. "All of that gets missed at the retail clinic." For their part, the clinics aren't marketing themselves as replacements for regular medical care. Still, MinuteClinic is aware that one-third of its customers do not have a family doctor. Its chief nursing officer is ready to help with that need, too: "That's why we keep a list of local doctors who are taking new patients at each location," she says. "We want people to establish a relationship with a primary care doctor." Recent changes to U.S. legislation affecting the healthcare industry, including provisions for expanding access to health insurance, are affecting the marketing of in-store clinics as well. Walgreens is preparing for higher demand by opening new Take Care clinics in more stores and considering whether to offer a wider range of medical services. Take Care and Walgreens jointly market the in-store clinics in Walgreens' ad campaigns and on the chain's website. In addition, Take Care uses its website plus television, radio, and direct mail to tell consumers about the features and benefits of its services. Attention, shoppers: Easy access to medical treatment is only one aisle away. Which of the six basics characteristics of services are likely to have the most influence on the way in-store clinics are marketed?
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What is service quality? Why do customers find it difficult to judge service quality?
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UNICEF and the Good Shirts Project The United Nation's Children's Fund (UNICEF) was created in 1946 as a nonprofi t to protect the welfare and rights of children around the world. Wherever children are threatened by natural disasters, extreme poverty, violence, disease, and other problems, UNICEF works with local and international partners to raise money and deliver services to relieve suffering and meet basic needs. Now UNICEF has teamed up with New York-based artists Justin and Christine Gignac, plus the online T-shirt retailer Threadless, on the Good Shirts Project. This is a combination fundraiser and educational program, raising awareness of the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa and raising money to provide clean water, food, health supplies, and other desperately needed items for children and adults in Somalia, Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Djibouti. "Hundreds of thousands of children are at imminent risk of death," Gignac explains. "Obviously, we need to do something to help, and are fortunate to have been included in this effort to raise money for the U.S. Fund for UNICEF to support lifesaving relief efforts." Good Shirts follows in the footsteps of the Gignacs' previous "Wants for Sale" art series, where they created paintings of items and experiences they wanted-and sold each painting for the amount of money they would have to pay for the item or experience. Similarly, each of the UNICEF shirts is priced at the cost of buying what the shirt shows for people in the Horn of Africa. For example, the white T-shirt featuring a big, colorful mosquito sells for $18.57, which pays for three insecticide-treated nets to protect from malaria. The white T-shirt featuring a green cargo plane sells for $300,000, the cost of chartering a flight from UNICEF's warehouse in Copenhagen to carry aid supplies to Nairobi, Kenya. In all, the artists created a dozen eye-catching T-shirts with light-hearted images "to remind people of the good they're doing by buying one," says Gignac. Threadless produces the T-shirts and sells them online, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to UNICEF. The artists donate their time and designs, and the BBH New York ad agency provides free marketing assistance. "We're literally letting people wear their donation as a source of pride and as a means to spread the word," says a BBH executive. "If friends get a little competitive over who's being more altruistic, all the better." To communicate with potential donors and keep the public informed about its services, UNICEF is an active user of social media. It has nearly 1 million followers on Twitter, where it uses the #goodshirts hashtag when tweeting about Good Shirts. UNICEF has nearly 2 million followers on Facebook and maintains a YouTube channel where videos are posted in multiple languages. Good Shirts is one of a number of initiatives that UNICEF uses to call attention to world trouble-spots where children are in need of aid. When UNICEF's celebrity ambassadors, including Sarah Jessica Parker, Clay Aiken, and Laurence Fishburne, travel to these areas, they use their fame to spread UNICEF's message and attract media coverage. In a decades-old Halloween tradition, many U.S. children carry orange "Trick or Treat for UNICEF" containers and ask for donations as they go door-to-door in their costumes. No matter where in the world children are threatened, UNICEF is ready to help. Identify UNICEF's target public and client publics. Who is the target market for Good Shirts' social media messages?
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UNICEF and the Good Shirts Project The United Nation's Children's Fund (UNICEF) was created in 1946 as a nonprofi t to protect the welfare and rights of children around the world. Wherever children are threatened by natural disasters, extreme poverty, violence, disease, and other problems, UNICEF works with local and international partners to raise money and deliver services to relieve suffering and meet basic needs. Now UNICEF has teamed up with New York-based artists Justin and Christine Gignac, plus the online T-shirt retailer Threadless, on the Good Shirts Project. This is a combination fundraiser and educational program, raising awareness of the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa and raising money to provide clean water, food, health supplies, and other desperately needed items for children and adults in Somalia, Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Djibouti. "Hundreds of thousands of children are at imminent risk of death," Gignac explains. "Obviously, we need to do something to help, and are fortunate to have been included in this effort to raise money for the U.S. Fund for UNICEF to support lifesaving relief efforts." Good Shirts follows in the footsteps of the Gignacs' previous "Wants for Sale" art series, where they created paintings of items and experiences they wanted-and sold each painting for the amount of money they would have to pay for the item or experience. Similarly, each of the UNICEF shirts is priced at the cost of buying what the shirt shows for people in the Horn of Africa. For example, the white T-shirt featuring a big, colorful mosquito sells for $18.57, which pays for three insecticide-treated nets to protect from malaria. The white T-shirt featuring a green cargo plane sells for $300,000, the cost of chartering a flight from UNICEF's warehouse in Copenhagen to carry aid supplies to Nairobi, Kenya. In all, the artists created a dozen eye-catching T-shirts with light-hearted images "to remind people of the good they're doing by buying one," says Gignac. Threadless produces the T-shirts and sells them online, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to UNICEF. The artists donate their time and designs, and the BBH New York ad agency provides free marketing assistance. "We're literally letting people wear their donation as a source of pride and as a means to spread the word," says a BBH executive. "If friends get a little competitive over who's being more altruistic, all the better." To communicate with potential donors and keep the public informed about its services, UNICEF is an active user of social media. It has nearly 1 million followers on Twitter, where it uses the #goodshirts hashtag when tweeting about Good Shirts. UNICEF has nearly 2 million followers on Facebook and maintains a YouTube channel where videos are posted in multiple languages. Good Shirts is one of a number of initiatives that UNICEF uses to call attention to world trouble-spots where children are in need of aid. When UNICEF's celebrity ambassadors, including Sarah Jessica Parker, Clay Aiken, and Laurence Fishburne, travel to these areas, they use their fame to spread UNICEF's message and attract media coverage. In a decades-old Halloween tradition, many U.S. children carry orange "Trick or Treat for UNICEF" containers and ask for donations as they go door-to-door in their costumes. No matter where in the world children are threatened, UNICEF is ready to help. What ideas and services are involved in UNICEF's product?
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Imagine you are the owner of a new service business. What is your service? Be creative. What are some of the most important considerations in developing the service, training salespeople, and communicating about your service to potential customers?
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Identify and discuss the major characteristics of services.
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