Management Study Set 36

Business

Quiz 14 :

Understanding Individual Behavior

Quiz 14 :

Understanding Individual Behavior

Question Type
search
arrow
Which of the four components of emotional intelligence do you consider most important to an effective manager in today's world? Why?
Free
Essay
Answer:

Answer:

Emotional intelligence components relate to effective management in today's world:
• Self-awareness: Self-awareness is the ability to assess your own performance and feelings, and accurately determine your strengths and limitations. This is critical to management performance as it allows managers to identify and improve any weaknesses in their management abilities.
• Self-management: Self-management is the ability to control any harmful emotions so that they don't distort thinking or reduce the ability to get things done. This is critical to the management performance as it allows managers to accomplish their objectives even when under stress or when they have negative emotions from difficult personal or interpersonal situations.
• Social awareness: Social awareness is the ability to emphasize with others, and interpret how others are feeling without them explaining it. This is critical to management performance as it allows managers to identify problems brewing in their group - perhaps two team members aren't getting along, or perhaps a staff member is having trouble with their workload - and then helps resolve them before they impact team performance.
• Relationship management: Relationship management is the ability to build positive relationships with others and to respond to and influence them. This is critical to the management performance as it allows managers to direct their team in a positive fashion, where a staff member respects the manager and respond to requests.

Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
How might a manager be able to use an understanding of perceptual selectivity and perceptual organization to communicate more effectively with subordinates?
Free
Essay
Answer:

Answer:

Perceptual selectivity is the screening process people use to determine which items to pay attention to. Perceptual organization is the process people use to categorize and organize information they see. Managers can use this information to communicate more effectively, by clearly pointing out the most important aspects of the information they are sharing, providing lists or bullet points for the most crucial items they need subordinates to remember, and comparing new information to something the employees already understand wherever possible.

Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
Reflex Systems As the plane took off from the L.A. airport for Chicago and home, Henry Rankin tried to unwind, something that didn't come naturally to the Reflex Systems software engineer. He needed time to think, and the flight from Los Angeles was a welcome relief. He went to L.A. to help two members of his project team solve technical glitches in software. Rankin had been pushing himself and his team hard for three months now, and he didn't know when they would get a break. Rankin was responsible for the technical implementation of the new customer relationship management software being installed for western and eastern sales offices in L.A. and Chicago. The software was badly needed to improve follow-up sales for his company. Reflex Systems. Reflex sold exercise equipment to high schools and colleges through a national force of 310 salespeople. Reflex also sold products to small and medium-sized businesses for recreation centers. Rankin knew CEO Mike Frazer saw the new CRM software as the answer to one of the exercise equipment manufacturer's most persistent problems. Even though Reflex's low prices generated healthy sales, follow-up service was spotty. Consequently, getting repeat business from customers-high schools, colleges, and corporate recreation centers-was an uphill battle. Excited by the prospect of finally removing this major roadblock, Frazer ordered the CRM software installed in just ten weeks, a goal Rankin privately thought was unrealistic. He also felt the project budget wasn't adequate. Rankin thought about meeting the next day with his three Chicago team members, and about the status update he would give his boss, Nicole Dyer, the senior vice president for Information Technology. Rankin remembered that Dyer had scheduled ten weeks for the CRM project. He had always been a top performer by driving himself hard and had been in his management position three years now. He was good with technology, but was frustrated when members of his five-person team didn't seem as committed. Dyer told him last week that she didn't feel a sense of urgency from his team. How could she think that? Rankin requested that team members work evenings and weekends because the budget was too tight to fill a vacant position. They agreed to put in the hours, although they didn't seem enthusiastic. Still, Frazer was the boss, so if he wanted the job done in tea weeks, Rankin would do everything in his power to deliver, even if it meant the entire team worked nights and weekends. He wasn't asking any more of his subordinates than he was asking of himself, as he frequently reminded them when they came to him with bloodshot eyes and complained about the hours. Rankin thought back to a flight one month ago when he returned to Chicago from L.A. Sally Phillips sat next to him. Phillips was on one of five members on Rankin's team and told him she had an offer from a well-known competitor. The money was less, but she was interested in the quality of life aspect of the company. Phillips asked for feedback on how she was doing and about her career prospects at Reflex. Rankin said he didn't want her to leave, but what more could he say? She got along well with people but she wasn't as technically gifted as some on the team. Rankin needed her help to finish the project and he told her so. Two weeks later, though, she had turned in her letter of resignation, and now the team was shorthanded. Rankin was also aware that his own possible promotion in two years, when Nicole Dyer was eligible for retirement, depended on his success with this project. He would just take up the slack himself. He loved studying, analyzing, and solving technical problems when he could get time alone. Henry Rankin knew that Nicole Dyer had noticed a lack of commitment on the part of the team members. He wondered whether she had discussed the team's performance with Frazer as well. Rankin hadn't noticed any other problems, but he recalled his partner on the project, Sam Matheny, saying that two Chicago team members, Bob Finley and Lynne Johnston, were avoiding each other. How did Sam know that? Matheny was in charge of nontechnical sales implementation of the CRM project, which meant training salespeople, redesigning sales procedures, updating customer records, and so forth. Rankin called Finley and Johnston to his office and said he expected them to get along for the good of the project. Finley said he had overreacted to Johnston from lack of sleep and wondered when the project would be over. Rankin wasn't certain because of all the problems with both software and hardware, but he said the project shouldn't last more than another month. As the plane taxied to the gate, an exhausted Rankin couldn't quell his growing fears that as the deadline fast approached, the project team was crumbling. How could he meet that deadline? As the plane taxied to the gate at Chicago, Rankin wondered about the projects success. Was there more to managing this team than working hard and pushing others hard? Even he was tired. Maybe he would ask his wife when he got home. He hadn't seen her or the kids for a week, but they had not complained. Does Rankin display type A or type B behavior? What are the causes of stress for his team?
Free
Essay
Answer:

Answer:

Manager H is in charge of a large software installation project. The timeframe was very short, and they are nearing the deadline. His team has been under a lot of pressure and one member has left the company, making achievement of the deadline even tougher.
Manager H shows type A behavior, which is characterized by competitiveness, impatience, and devotion to work. These behaviors are causing stress for his team, since he is focused solely on completing the project and has no regard for personal issues. He is also much more interested in technical issues than people, he prefers to do work himself rather than work with a team, and he is oblivious to the feelings of his team about the projects - all of which contribute to the members of the team feeling less valued and cause stress.

Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
You are manager, and you realize that one of your employees repeatedly teases coworkers born in another country, saying that they come from a backward country with pagan beliefs. How would you decide whether it's necessary to respond to the situation? If you decide decide to intervene what would your response be?
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
The chapter suggests that optimism is an important characteristic for a manager, yet some employees complain that optimistic managers cause them significant stress because they expect their subordinates to meet unreasonable goals or expectations. How might an employee deal with a perpetually optimistic manager?
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
In what ways might the cognitive and affective components of attitude influence the behavior of employees who ate faced with learning entirely new set of computer-related skills to retain their jobs at a manufacturing facility?
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
Why do you think workplace stress is skyrocketing? Do you think it is a trend that will continue? Explain the reasons for your answer. Do you think it is the responsibility of managers and organizations to help employees manage stress? Why or why not?
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
As a manager, how might you deal with an employee who is always displaying negative emotions that affect the rest of the team? How might you use an understanding of attributions and emotional contagion to help you decide what to do?
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
Surveys by the Conference Board show that job satisfaction has declined from 61 percent of people surveyed in 1987 to 45 percent in 2009, and one workplace analyst has said a high level of dissatisfaction is "the new normal." What are some factors that might explain this decline in satisfaction levels? Do you think it is possible for managers to reverse the trend? Discuss.
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
Reflex Systems As the plane took off from the L.A. airport for Chicago and home, Henry Rankin tried to unwind, something that didn't come naturally to the Reflex Systems software engineer. He needed time to think, and the flight from Los Angeles was a welcome relief. He went to L.A. to help two members of his project team solve technical glitches in software. Rankin had been pushing himself and his team hard for three months now, and he didn't know when they would get a break. Rankin was responsible for the technical implementation of the new customer relationship management software being installed for western and eastern sales offices in L.A. and Chicago. The software was badly needed to improve follow-up sales for his company. Reflex Systems. Reflex sold exercise equipment to high schools and colleges through a national force of 310 salespeople. Reflex also sold products to small and medium-sized businesses for recreation centers. Rankin knew CEO Mike Frazer saw the new CRM software as the answer to one of the exercise equipment manufacturer's most persistent problems. Even though Reflex's low prices generated healthy sales, follow-up service was spotty. Consequently, getting repeat business from customers-high schools, colleges, and corporate recreation centers-was an uphill battle. Excited by the prospect of finally removing this major roadblock, Frazer ordered the CRM software installed in just ten weeks, a goal Rankin privately thought was unrealistic. He also felt the project budget wasn't adequate. Rankin thought about meeting the next day with his three Chicago team members, and about the status update he would give his boss, Nicole Dyer, the senior vice president for Information Technology. Rankin remembered that Dyer had scheduled ten weeks for the CRM project. He had always been a top performer by driving himself hard and had been in his management position three years now. He was good with technology, but was frustrated when members of his five-person team didn't seem as committed. Dyer told him last week that she didn't feel a sense of urgency from his team. How could she think that? Rankin requested that team members work evenings and weekends because the budget was too tight to fill a vacant position. They agreed to put in the hours, although they didn't seem enthusiastic. Still, Frazer was the boss, so if he wanted the job done in tea weeks, Rankin would do everything in his power to deliver, even if it meant the entire team worked nights and weekends. He wasn't asking any more of his subordinates than he was asking of himself, as he frequently reminded them when they came to him with bloodshot eyes and complained about the hours. Rankin thought back to a flight one month ago when he returned to Chicago from L.A. Sally Phillips sat next to him. Phillips was on one of five members on Rankin's team and told him she had an offer from a well-known competitor. The money was less, but she was interested in the quality of life aspect of the company. Phillips asked for feedback on how she was doing and about her career prospects at Reflex. Rankin said he didn't want her to leave, but what more could he say? She got along well with people but she wasn't as technically gifted as some on the team. Rankin needed her help to finish the project and he told her so. Two weeks later, though, she had turned in her letter of resignation, and now the team was shorthanded. Rankin was also aware that his own possible promotion in two years, when Nicole Dyer was eligible for retirement, depended on his success with this project. He would just take up the slack himself. He loved studying, analyzing, and solving technical problems when he could get time alone. Henry Rankin knew that Nicole Dyer had noticed a lack of commitment on the part of the team members. He wondered whether she had discussed the team's performance with Frazer as well. Rankin hadn't noticed any other problems, but he recalled his partner on the project, Sam Matheny, saying that two Chicago team members, Bob Finley and Lynne Johnston, were avoiding each other. How did Sam know that? Matheny was in charge of nontechnical sales implementation of the CRM project, which meant training salespeople, redesigning sales procedures, updating customer records, and so forth. Rankin called Finley and Johnston to his office and said he expected them to get along for the good of the project. Finley said he had overreacted to Johnston from lack of sleep and wondered when the project would be over. Rankin wasn't certain because of all the problems with both software and hardware, but he said the project shouldn't last more than another month. As the plane taxied to the gate, an exhausted Rankin couldn't quell his growing fears that as the deadline fast approached, the project team was crumbling. How could he meet that deadline? As the plane taxied to the gate at Chicago, Rankin wondered about the projects success. Was there more to managing this team than working hard and pushing others hard? Even he was tired. Maybe he would ask his wife when he got home. He hadn't seen her or the kids for a week, but they had not complained. What personality and behavior characteristics does Henry Rankin exhibit? Do you think these traits contribute to a good person-job fit for him? If you were an executive coach hired to help Rankin be a better manager, what would you say to him? Why?
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
How might understanding whether an employee has an internal or an external locus of control help a manager better communicate with, motivate, and lead the employee?
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
Review Exhibit 14.12. Which learning style best characterizes you? How can you use this understanding to improve your learning ability? To improve your management Skills? EXHIBIT 14.12 What's Your Learning Style? img
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
In the Big Five personality factors, extroversion is considered a "good" quality to have. Why might introversion be an equally positive quality?
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
Should i Fudge the Numbers? 89 Sara MacIntosh recently joined MicroPhone, a large telecommunications company, to take over the implementation of a massive customer service training project. The program was created by Kristin Cole, head of human resources and Sara's new boss. According to the grapevine, Kristin was hoping this project alone would give her the "star quality" she needed to earn a coveted promotion. Industry competition was heating up, and MicroPhone's strategy called for being the best at customer service, which meant having the most highly trained people in the industry, especially those who worked directly with customers. Kristin's new training program called for an average of one full week of intense customer service training for each of 3,000 people and had a price tag of about $40 million. Kristin put together a team of overworked staffers to develop the training program, but now she needed someone well qualified and dedicated to manage and implement the project. Sara, with eight years of experience, a long list of accomplishments, and advanced degrees in finance and organizational behavior, seemed perfect for the job. However, during a thorough review of the proposal, Sara discovered some assumptions built into the formulas that raised red flags. She approached Dan Sotal, the team's coordinator, about her concerns, but the more Dan tried to explain how the financial projections were derived, the more Sara realized that Kristin's proposal was seriously flawed. No matter how she tried to work them out, the most that could be squeezed out of the $40 million budget was 20 hours of training per person, not the 40 hours everyone expected for such a high price tag. Sara knew that, although the proposal had been largely developed before she came on board, it would bear her signature. As she carefully described the problems with the proposal to Kristin and outlined the potentially devastating consequences, Kristin impatiently tapped her pencil. Finally, she stood up, leaned forward, and interrupted Sara, quietly saying, "Sara, make the numbers work so that it adds up to 40 hours and stays within the $40 million budget." Sara glanced up and replied, "I don't think it can be done unless we either change the number of employees who are to be trained or the cost figure...." Kristin's smile froze on her face as she again interrupted. "I don't think you understand what I'm saying. We have too much at stake here. Make the previous numbers work." Stunned, Sara belatedly began to realize that Kristin was ordering her to fudge the numbers. She felt an anxiety attack coming on as she wondered what she should do. What Would You Do? 1. Make the previous numbers work. Kristin and the entire team have put massive amounts of time into the project, and they all expect you to be a team player. You don't want to let them down. Besides, this project is a great opportunity for you in a highly visible position. 2. Stick to your principles and refuse to fudge the numbers. Tell Kristin you will work overtime to help develop an alternate proposal that stays within the budget by providing more training to employees who work directly with customers and fewer training hours for those who don't have direct customer contact. 3. Go to the team and tell them what you've been asked to do. If they refuse to support you, threaten to reveal the true numbers to the CEO and board members.
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu
arrow
Reflex Systems As the plane took off from the L.A. airport for Chicago and home, Henry Rankin tried to unwind, something that didn't come naturally to the Reflex Systems software engineer. He needed time to think, and the flight from Los Angeles was a welcome relief. He went to L.A. to help two members of his project team solve technical glitches in software. Rankin had been pushing himself and his team hard for three months now, and he didn't know when they would get a break. Rankin was responsible for the technical implementation of the new customer relationship management software being installed for western and eastern sales offices in L.A. and Chicago. The software was badly needed to improve follow-up sales for his company. Reflex Systems. Reflex sold exercise equipment to high schools and colleges through a national force of 310 salespeople. Reflex also sold products to small and medium-sized businesses for recreation centers. Rankin knew CEO Mike Frazer saw the new CRM software as the answer to one of the exercise equipment manufacturer's most persistent problems. Even though Reflex's low prices generated healthy sales, follow-up service was spotty. Consequently, getting repeat business from customers-high schools, colleges, and corporate recreation centers-was an uphill battle. Excited by the prospect of finally removing this major roadblock, Frazer ordered the CRM software installed in just ten weeks, a goal Rankin privately thought was unrealistic. He also felt the project budget wasn't adequate. Rankin thought about meeting the next day with his three Chicago team members, and about the status update he would give his boss, Nicole Dyer, the senior vice president for Information Technology. Rankin remembered that Dyer had scheduled ten weeks for the CRM project. He had always been a top performer by driving himself hard and had been in his management position three years now. He was good with technology, but was frustrated when members of his five-person team didn't seem as committed. Dyer told him last week that she didn't feel a sense of urgency from his team. How could she think that? Rankin requested that team members work evenings and weekends because the budget was too tight to fill a vacant position. They agreed to put in the hours, although they didn't seem enthusiastic. Still, Frazer was the boss, so if he wanted the job done in tea weeks, Rankin would do everything in his power to deliver, even if it meant the entire team worked nights and weekends. He wasn't asking any more of his subordinates than he was asking of himself, as he frequently reminded them when they came to him with bloodshot eyes and complained about the hours. Rankin thought back to a flight one month ago when he returned to Chicago from L.A. Sally Phillips sat next to him. Phillips was on one of five members on Rankin's team and told him she had an offer from a well-known competitor. The money was less, but she was interested in the quality of life aspect of the company. Phillips asked for feedback on how she was doing and about her career prospects at Reflex. Rankin said he didn't want her to leave, but what more could he say? She got along well with people but she wasn't as technically gifted as some on the team. Rankin needed her help to finish the project and he told her so. Two weeks later, though, she had turned in her letter of resignation, and now the team was shorthanded. Rankin was also aware that his own possible promotion in two years, when Nicole Dyer was eligible for retirement, depended on his success with this project. He would just take up the slack himself. He loved studying, analyzing, and solving technical problems when he could get time alone. Henry Rankin knew that Nicole Dyer had noticed a lack of commitment on the part of the team members. He wondered whether she had discussed the team's performance with Frazer as well. Rankin hadn't noticed any other problems, but he recalled his partner on the project, Sam Matheny, saying that two Chicago team members, Bob Finley and Lynne Johnston, were avoiding each other. How did Sam know that? Matheny was in charge of nontechnical sales implementation of the CRM project, which meant training salespeople, redesigning sales procedures, updating customer records, and so forth. Rankin called Finley and Johnston to his office and said he expected them to get along for the good of the project. Finley said he had overreacted to Johnston from lack of sleep and wondered when the project would be over. Rankin wasn't certain because of all the problems with both software and hardware, but he said the project shouldn't last more than another month. As the plane taxied to the gate, an exhausted Rankin couldn't quell his growing fears that as the deadline fast approached, the project team was crumbling. How could he meet that deadline? As the plane taxied to the gate at Chicago, Rankin wondered about the projects success. Was there more to managing this team than working hard and pushing others hard? Even he was tired. Maybe he would ask his wife when he got home. He hadn't seen her or the kids for a week, but they had not complained. If you were Rankin, how would you have handled your team members (Sally Phillips, Bob Finley, and Lynne Johnston)? Be specific. What insights or behaviors would make Rankin a better manager?
Essay
Answer:
Tags
Choose question tag
close menu